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The first photo of the wedding of Alina Grosu

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Wedding Ukrainian singer was held on June 23 in Italy.

Until lavish celebrations Alina Grosu was married to a young man named Alexander — the lovers got married in Moscow in early June. Алина ГросуАлина ГросуBut what is a bride without a wedding dress, veils, and gorgeous cake! That gave the couple a wedding party during your travel in Europe. The celebration was held at Villa Allegri in Verona. And although the singer is in no hurry to share with the subscribers wedding photos, her guests are happy to publish pictures from the celebrations, wanting the young (as it opened at all), happiness and family well-being.

Алина Гросу
So, thanks to photos, followers were able to see not only the bride, but to find out which celebrities were invited to the ceremony. To congratulate the young in Italy are colleagues of Alina on the scene: Iryna Bilyk, Vitaliy Kozlovskiy, Pavel Zibrov, choreographer Dmitry Kolyadenko and, presumably, socialite Katya Osadchaya. Алина Гросу
 

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Apple

Join Apple’s Health Studies With New Research App

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Apple is launching three health studies in conjunction with its new Research app, available to download now from the App Store.

Enroll now to contribute to potentially groundbreaking medical discoveries: All you need is an iPhone or Apple Watch, a pulse, and, in one case, a menstrual cycle.

Conducted in partnership with Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the NIH’s National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), the Women’s Health Study focuses on how women’s periods relate to their overall health.

In what Apple claims is the “first long-term study of this scale and scope,” the study will use iDevices to collect data like cycle tracking information, and use monthly surveys to understand each participant’s unique menstrual experience.

Sounds like a blast.

“Treating the menstrual cycle as a vital sign, such as heart rate or blood pressure, could lead to the earlier detection of many health conditions, both gynecological and systemic, as well as a better understanding of women’s reproductive health and health needs overall,” according to study researcher Shruthi Mahalingaiah, an assistant professor at Harvard Chan School.

“We are uniquely poised to translate this data into discovery that will lead to better awareness and empowerment around women’s health issues on a global scale,” she said in a statement.

The Research app only shares data when a user approves, and includes a detailed consent for each study that allows a user to control the type of data shared. (Photo Credit: Apple)

If the female reproductive system isn’t your thing, you can sign up for Apple’s Heart and Movement Study, which measures the quality and quantity of a person’s movement, or the Apple Hearing Study, set to explore how headphone usage and environmental sound exposure can impact hearing over time.

“In the past it’s been very difficult to quantify behavioral factors. With data from smartphones and wearable devices, we can eventually measure these factors unobtrusively over long periods of time,” analyst Jukka-Pekka Onnela, associate professor at Harvard Chan School, said. 

“This is scientifically incredibly exciting,” he continued. “And I believe that this research will enable more effective and more personalized interventions in the future.”

With regards to privacy, Apple emphasized the promise that user data will not be sold. You decide which studies to join and when to leave, and control what types of information are shared.

Studies must inform participants how their data supports the research.

“[This] marks an important moment as we embark on research initiatives that may offer incredible learnings in areas long sought after by the medical community,” Apple’s Chief Operating Officer Jeff Williams said.

“Participants on the Research app,” he explained, “have the opportunity to make a tremendous impact that could lead to new discoveries and help millions lead healthier lives.”

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Apple

Apple Invites Veterans to Access Health Records on iPhone

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Apple is putting health records directly into veterans’ pockets.

The tech titan partnered with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to give vets access to personal data on their iPhone.

Following a trial run with select patients this summer, all former military personnel who use iOS and receive care through the Veterans Health Administration now have entreé to a “fuller, more comprehensive picture” of their health.

Patients’ medical records are typically held in multiple locations, forcing people to log into various provider websites to manually piece together their data.

But what if those details were stored at your fingertips—accessible with the click of a button?

Apple’s Health Records feature debuted in beta early last year, with Johns Hopkins Medicine, Cedars-Sinai, and Penn Medicine among the first participants.

“Helping veterans gain a better understanding of their health is our chance to show our gratitude for their service,” Apple Chief Operating Officer Jeff Williams said in a statement.

Health Records on iPhone brings together veterans’ hospitals, clinics, and existing information in one place. (Photo Credit: Apple)

“By working with the VA to offer Health Records on iPhone,” he continued, “we hope to help those who served have greater peace of mind that their health care is in good hands.”

The VA is the country’s largest medical system, providing service to more than 9 million veterans across 1,243 facilities—including hospitals and clinics.

This week, it joined Johns Hopkins, University of California San Diego, Quest Diagnostics, Allscripts, and 400 other healthcare provider organizations, laboratory networks, and electronic health records vendors to support Health Records on iPhone.

Vets can simply sign into their provider’s patient portal in the Health app to find details about allergies, conditions, immunizations, lab results, medications, procedures, and vitals.

The platform regularly updates personal records, giving folks access to “a single, integrated snapshot of their health profile whenever they want, quickly and privately,” according to Apple.

All Health Records data—including sensitive, personal information—is encrypted and protected with the user’s iPhone passcode, Touch ID, or Face ID.

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General

DeepMind AI Can Predict Kidney Failure 48 Hours Early

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Artificial intelligence can predict a leading cause of preventable patient harm up to two days before it occurs.

Google’s DeepMind, in partnership with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, developed technology that could give doctors a 48-hour head start in treating acute kidney injury (AKI).

The condition (previously known as acute renal failure) causes build-up of waste in the blood, making it hard for the kidneys to balance fluid; the result is often a sudden failure or damage that occurs over a few hours or a few days.

Affecting up to one in five hospitalized patients in the US and UK, AKI is notoriously difficult to spot, and deterioration can happen quickly.

Machine learning to the rescue!

Using anonymized health records from the VA network, DeepMind’s AI correctly predicted nine out of 10 patients whose condition deteriorated so severely they required dialysis.

“This could provide a window in the future for earlier preventative treatment and avoid the need for more invasive procedures like kidney dialysis,” study co-authors Dominic King and Mustafa Suleyman wrote in a blog post.

The team hopes the model will one day be used to identify other major causes of disease and deterioration, including life-threatening infection sepsis.

Their research was published this week in the journal Nature.

DeepMind wants to use AI to give doctors a 48-hour head start on life-threatening illness (via DeepMind)

“This is our team’s biggest healthcare research breakthrough to date, demonstrating the ability to not only spot deterioration more effectively, but actually predict it before it happens,” Suleyman and King said.

The technology, however, won’t help anyone without the right tools to alert specialists.

“Better technology is desperately needed so that critical information can be delivered to the right specialist at the right time,” DeepMind said.

Enter Streams, a mobile medical assistant for clinicians, which has been in use at the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust since early 2017.

The app allows specialists to review urgent cases in 15 minutes or less—a process that might otherwise take several hours—and helps reduce the number of AKI cases missed at the hospital.

“Getting the right information about the right patient at the right time is a huge problem for healthcare systems across the globe,” according to King and Suleyman.

“These results comprise the building blocks for our long-term vision of preventative healthcare, helping doctors to intervene in a proactive, rather than reactive, manner,” they added.

Research, led by David Feinberg, will continue as part of Google Health.

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