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DaVinci MIQRO Vaporizer Review: Vaping Gets Tiny

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Vapes are getting smarter and smaller all the time, and sometimes at the same time. DaVinci Vaporizer’s new MIQRO vaporizer is its tiniest ground material vape yet, packing plenty of customization to get just the right plumes of floral recreation you want. DaVinci sent us the MIQRO Explorers Collection to test.

The MIQRO is the updated, slightly scaled-back version of the DaVinci IQ, which our sister site PCMag reviewed last year. The IQ is pretty powerful and very flexible (for a ground-material-only vape that can’t use concentrates), with lots of options for temperature settings and a connected app for customizing those settings further. The IQ was also pretty expensive, at $279. The MIQRO cuts down the size by 33 percent and the price by even more; this smaller vape is a much more wallet-friendly $149. It also manages to keep pretty much all of the IQ’s on-board features in its smaller, less expensive frame.

It’s shaped just like the compact IQ, but is even smaller at 3.1 by 1.3 by 0.9 inches (HWD). We got the graphite version, but it also comes in Onyx (black), Cobalt (blue), Rust (red), and Amethyst (purple). The controls are basically the same as on the IQ. The right side holds a power/mode button (press five times to turn on or off, press once to toggle between Smart Paths and Precision heating modes) and a rocker button for adjusting temperature.

A 5-by-3 LED array shows the vape’s status, including how much battery power it has, and whether it’s currently heating up or if it’s at a stable temperature. The array is smaller than the IQ’s 16-by-3 LED array, so it can only show one number at a time instead of all three of the current or set temperature. You have to stare at it for a few seconds for all the numbers to scroll.

The Smart Paths mode uses preset start and end temperatures to slowly raise the heat as you vape over each pull. There are four Smart Paths to choose from, from 350-370 degrees (Fahrenheit) to 410-430 degrees. You can also use Precision mode to set the MIQRO to a precise temperature from 255 to 430 degrees. All you need to do is press the rocker button up or down to select the Smart Path or temperature.

Actually, all you can do is press the rocker button up or down to change the temperature, because the MIQRO drops more than physical size and price from the IQ; it drops app support. This means you have to manually set the temperature on the vape itself instead of through the DaVinci app. It’s not a big problem, because I found the DaVinci app crashed too much to be very useful with the IQ to begin with, but combined with the smaller display it makes precision temperature adjustments tedious. Find your favorite temperature and stick with it.

The oven is fairly small, and you can make it smaller by adjusting the pearl on the door. Don’t expect to run a full session with six people without repacking; this is a good vape for solo users with maybe a friend or two to share it with.

For its size, the MIQRO performs pretty great. It heats up rapidly, hitting 370 degrees in 39 seconds. The vapor it produces is smooth and dense, and you can switch between the flat mouthpiece and tube-shaped extended mouthpiece (that also enables the use of bubblers) depending on your tastes. It might not create massive plumes, but considering how compact it is, the MIQRO definitely gets the job done.

The standard MIQRO includes the vape itself, the extended mouthpiece, a USB cable, and an accessory kit which includes a little keychain with a metal pick for getting ground material out of the oven, some pipe cleaners, and some alcohol wipes. The Collector’s Edition MIQRO is available for $50 more ($199), and adds a removable rubber sleeve for protection, a canvas carry bag, an extra battery, a metal carry can keychain that can hold an extra battery and ground material, and a grinder coin that works like a circular grinder card. The case, sleeve, and extra battery make the Collector’s Edition worth the price, and it’s still $80 less than the IQ.

The DaVinci MIQRO is an easy recommendation, even over the excellent DaVinci IQ. It’s small, stylish, easy to use, and reliable. The smaller display and lack of app support is slightly inconvenient, but considering the MIQRO is just over half the price of the IQ, it’s a worthy trade-off.

Pros

Compact
Flexible
Fast heat-up
Smooth vapor
Great Price
Easy to Use

Cons

Small oven
Small display
Tedious temperature adjustment

Need more to compare to? We gave the Firefly 2 four stars when we reviewed it. Learn about the best budget vape ever made. And we’ve got a great review of Eyce’s silicone water pipes. Follow all reviews and news for vapes here

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Americans Are Checking Their Phones More Than Ever

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Like most people, my smartphone is an extension of me: It’s the first thing I see after I wake up and one of the last things I see before I go to sleep. It sits on my desk as I work, in my pocket while I travel, and in my hand when I make a cup of tea.

And I know I’m not alone.

According to consulting firm Deloitte, Americans are viewing their smartphones more often than ever before—on average 52 times per day, up 6 percent from last year.

The unsurprising data was revealed as part of the UK-based firm’s 2018 Global Mobile Consumer Survey, which confirms the central role of handsets in the connected ecosystem.

One of the only gadgets (aside from smartwatches) to gain market penetration over the last year, smartphones have become a primary form of online access for 20 percent of U.S. adults.

After all, who needs traditional broadband service when you’ve got a mobile connection and Wi-Fi?

“This year’s survey really advances the story of smartphones as the true center of our lives, both inside and outside the home,” Deloitte Vice Chairman Kevin Westcott said in a statement.

“The smartphone remains the go-to device for consumers,” he continued, “enabling them to do anything they desire: communicate, work, socialize, consume entertainment, stay fit, or take take of things at home.”

But the first step is admitting you have a problem. And many people have.

Nearly 40 percent of Americans think they use their smartphone too much, Deloitte said; a whopping 60 percent of 18- to 34-year-olds concede to mobile overuse.

And while 63 percent of folks claim they’re trying to limit handset usage, only a little more than half are succeeding.

“While smartphones are becoming the nerve center of our homes, our businesses, our families, and our lives, consumers are craving more speed and responsiveness as their usage patterns mature,” according to Mic Locker, a managing director in Deloitte’s Technology, Media, and Telecommunications industry practice.

“It will be interesting to watch the availability of 5G networks and 5G-enabled smartphones over the next year to see if consumers’ yearning for better performance is satisfied,” she added.

That’s not the only thing smartphone-addicted Americans desire: A majority of folks also worry about keeping their personal data private.

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Wireless System Uses RFID Tags to Sense Food Contamination

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The MIT Media Lab is putting food-safety detection directly in the hands of consumers.

Researchers developed a wireless system leveraging the RFID tags already on many products to sense potential contamination.

Inspired by two real-life events involving corrupted baby formula and poisoned alcohol, the team created a simple program that could save lives.

Dubbed RFIQ, the MIT reader senses minute changes in wireless signals emitted from radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags when those signals interact with food.

Even the smallest adjustments correspond to levels of certain contaminants, according to a new release. A machine-learning model reviews those correlations and, given a new material, can predict if it is pure or tainted, and at what concentration.

When tested on baby formula laced with melamine (an organic compound used to make plastics which, in high concentrations, is toxic) and alcohol diluted with methanol, the system boasted a success rate of 96 percent and 97 percent, respectively.

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“In recent years, there have been so many hazards related to food and drinks we could have avoided if we all had tools to sense food quality and safety ourselves,” study co-author Fadel Adib, an assistant professor at the Media Lab, said in a statement. “We want to democratize food quality and safety, and bring it to the hands of everyone.”

RFID tags—stickers with tiny, ultra-high-frequency antennas—can be employed in a variety of applications, including tracking of goods, people, and animals; contactless payments; machine-readable travel documents; and timing sporting events.

A wireless reader (used manually or automatically) pings the tag, which emits a unique signal containing information about whatever it’s attached to. Electromagnetic waves then penetrate the material and return distorted—in MIT’s case, to a machine-learning model on a separate computer.

Currently restricted to a lab, the system may eventually be available for commercial use; researchers envision a future in which people have their own reader and software to conduct food-safety sensing before buying virtually any product.

Models could also be implemented into supermarkets or smart fridges to keep a steady eye on food spoilage.

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Study: Sex-Crazed Lawbreakers Will Turn Autonomous Cars Into Roving Brothels

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Buried in an otherwise dry report on autonomous vehicles and urban tourism is the very interesting conundrum of selling sex in self-driving cars.

Researchers Scott Cohen and Debbie Hopkins teamed up to explore how advances in transportation technology could affect global tourism.

Their study, published in the journal Annals of Tourism Research, highlights the seedier side of driverless vehicles.

“It’s only a natural conclusion that sex in autonomous vehicles will become a phenomenon,” Cohen, a tourism professor at the University of Surrey, told The Washington Post, citing convenience and the “lack of front-seat chaperones” (as the newspaper put it).

Still in their infancy, self-driving cars are expected to flood roads in less than a decade.

And when they do, luxurious cabs (featuring room enough for bedding, perhaps a massage chair) will chase out traditional taxis, with their glass partition and sticky seats.

Enter brothels on wheels.

“‘Hotels-by-the-hour’ are likely to be replaced by CAVs, and this will have implications for urban tourism, as sex plays a central role in many tourism experiences,” Cohen and Hopkins, a transport studies lecturer at the University of Oxford, wrote in their report.

“It is just a small leap to imagine Amsterdam’s Red Light District ‘on the move,’” they added.

The world’s oldest profession, of course, is illegal in the US (save for a few counties in Nevada). But, as the study authors pointed out, motivated lawbreakers will find a way around those pesky rules.

Shared CAVs, they said, will likely be monitored, “to deter passengers having sex or using drugs in them, and to prevent violence.”

Surveillance, however, can easily be disabled or removed. And personal autonomous cars will likely be “immune” from such scrutiny.

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